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Clinical Science

Abstract

Morganella. morganii is considered a rare and unusual cause of infection despite its vast presence worldwide. Recently there has been increasing documentation of its opportunistic ability to infect immunocompromised patients, most notably in intensive care units.

The patient is a 55-year-old female with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus(II), end-stage renal disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and a left above-knee amputation. She presented with shortness of breath, hypotension, and difficulties staying awake. Blood pressure on admission was 92/48 with an oxygen saturation of 82%. On physical exam, a 3cm linear non-purulent wound was found on the dorsum of her right foot. Blood cultures drawn grew Morganella morganii, prompting subsequent treatment for the bacteremia. Concerns for Osteomyelitis arose, though later dispelled. CTA of her right lower extremity revealed cellulitis and advanced calcified atherosclerotic vascular disease. On day 5, the patient's condition soon stabilized, and repeat blood cultures showed no growth. The patient was subsequently discharged with instructions to follow up with Podiatry and Infectious disease for her wound.

Morganella. morganii is often forgotten as a potential multidrug-resistant organism that can cause serious illness, especially in critically ill patients. Reports of bacteremia, urinary tract, skin, and soft-tissue infections due to invasive procedures and prolonged hospital stays have been documented. Stemming from to its increased rates of occurrence and its ability to acquire drug-resistant genes. M. morganii can complicate treatment regimens and increase morbidity and mortality in patients. Clinicians should be aware and recognize this pathogen as a potentially clinically significant cause of infection.

Presentation Type

Poster

Academic Level

Medical Student

Mentor/PI Department

Internal Medicine

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The Unusual Opportunistic Pathogen with Superbug Potential: A Case of Morganella morganii bacteremia

Morganella. morganii is considered a rare and unusual cause of infection despite its vast presence worldwide. Recently there has been increasing documentation of its opportunistic ability to infect immunocompromised patients, most notably in intensive care units.

The patient is a 55-year-old female with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus(II), end-stage renal disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and a left above-knee amputation. She presented with shortness of breath, hypotension, and difficulties staying awake. Blood pressure on admission was 92/48 with an oxygen saturation of 82%. On physical exam, a 3cm linear non-purulent wound was found on the dorsum of her right foot. Blood cultures drawn grew Morganella morganii, prompting subsequent treatment for the bacteremia. Concerns for Osteomyelitis arose, though later dispelled. CTA of her right lower extremity revealed cellulitis and advanced calcified atherosclerotic vascular disease. On day 5, the patient's condition soon stabilized, and repeat blood cultures showed no growth. The patient was subsequently discharged with instructions to follow up with Podiatry and Infectious disease for her wound.

Morganella. morganii is often forgotten as a potential multidrug-resistant organism that can cause serious illness, especially in critically ill patients. Reports of bacteremia, urinary tract, skin, and soft-tissue infections due to invasive procedures and prolonged hospital stays have been documented. Stemming from to its increased rates of occurrence and its ability to acquire drug-resistant genes. M. morganii can complicate treatment regimens and increase morbidity and mortality in patients. Clinicians should be aware and recognize this pathogen as a potentially clinically significant cause of infection.

 

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