Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1-2020

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine hemodynamic and vascular responses between machine-weight and free-weight exercise. Resistance-trained individuals were assigned to a machine-weight (n = 13) or free-weight (n = 15) group. Groups completed two visits consisting of their assigned exercise condition and a control (CON). A 2 × 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA was used to test the effects of group across condition and time on the hemodynamic parameters [cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and stroke volume (SV)]. A 2 × 2 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA was used to test the effects of group across condition and time on the hemodynamic variable, forearm vascular conductance (FVC), as well as on vascular measures [forearm blood flow (FBF), blood flow peak, and total reactive hyperemia (RH)]. Main effects were analyzed using pairwise comparisons. The results of the present study demonstrate that both machine-weight and free-weight exercise produce similar (p > 0.05) alterations in hemodynamics and vascular function. Specifically, during recovery both groups demonstrated significant (p ≤ 0.05) increases in measures of hemodynamics such as CO, HR and FVC, as well as significant (p ≤ 0.05) decreases in TPR, MAP, and SV. Measures of vascular function such as FBF, blood flow peak, and total RH were also significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased during recovery. Therefore, this study suggests that either machine weight or free-weight exercise may induce acute hemodynamic and vascular benefits, which may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD events.

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