Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

4-2007

Abstract

Amy Greenberg’s study Manifest Manhood provides an intriguing new interpretation of the meaning of Manifest Destiny and the discourse of American expansionism during the middle part of the nineteenth century. Reversing commonly held historical interpretations, Greenberg convincingly shows that Manifest Destiny continued to hold its appeal to Americans after the Mexican-American War. Proponents of aggressive expansionism viewed the Caribbean, the Pacific, and Central America as the “new frontiers” in need of conquering. Between the conclusion of the Mexican- American War and the outbreak of the Civil War, the practice of filibustering, the invasion of foreign territory by private American mercenaries without official government approval, rose to epidemic proportions.

Comments

Original published version available at https://doi.org/10.1353/swh.2007.0041

First Page

554

Last Page

555

Publication Title

Southwestern Historical Quarterly

DOI

10.1353/swh.2007.0041

Included in

History Commons

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