Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

This study explores perceptions that affect adherence behaviors among Mexican Americans living with dialysis. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 15 Mexican Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) living on dialysis, 15 family members, and 6 health care personnel who provided care to them. Four themes emerged: (a) positive influences to adherence, (b) obstacles to adherence, (c) daily activity losses, and (d) fears about living with dialysis. From the findings, the perceptions given for non-adherence with the dialysis regimen ranged from denial of the condition, lack of pre-education, to cultural factors. Those given for adherence included prolonged life, family, and hope of getting a transplant. Health care providers were the reminder to adhere. Several cultural factors influenced their adherence perceptions. Strategies to enhance adherence behaviors should focus on knowledge about dialysis, use of the collective efficacy of the family, and the inclusion of cultural values.

Comments

Original published version available at https://doi.org/10.1177%2F2158244015574961

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Publication Title

SAGE Open

DOI

10.1177/2158244015574961

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