Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2017

Abstract

Introduction: In this paper, we report on a study exploring a potential typology of primary care patients referred for integrated behavioral health care (IBHC) services. We considered whether primary care patients could be grouped into meaningful clusters based on perceived need for behavioral health services, barriers to accessing care, and past-year service utilization. We also describe the development of a working partnership between our university-based research team and a federally qualified health center (FQHC).

Method: A total of 105 adult primary care patients referred for same-day behavioral health appointments completed a brief self-report questionnaire assessing past-year behavioral health concerns, service utilization, and perceived barriers to utilization. Results: Hierarchical and k-means cluster analyses revealed three groups: (1) Well-served patients, characterized by high perceived need for services, high service utilization, and low barriers to service use (40%); (2) Underserved patients, characterized by high perceived need, low service utilization, and high barriers to service use (20%); and (3) Subclinical patients, characterized by low perceived need, low service utilization, and low barriers to service use (20%). Clusters were reliably differentiated by age, primary language, insurance status, and global functioning.

Discussion: We found primary care patients could be grouped into three categories and that 60% (Underserved and Subclinical) represented groups less commonly seen in traditional mental health settings. IBHC may be a promising approach for extending the reach of mental health care, and partnerships between FQHCs and university-based research teams may be a promising approach for conducting research on the IBHC service delivery model.

Comments

© 2017, American Psychological Association. Original published version available at https://doi.org/10.1037/fsh0000268

Publication Title

Families, systems & health : the journal of collaborative family healthcare

DOI

10.1037/fsh0000268

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.