Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-2014

Abstract

Toxoplasmosis gondii is a parasite whose natural host is the cat. Ocular toxoplasmosis can be categorized into two forms of infections: congenital, where an infant is infected in utero; and acquired, where an individual is typically infected by ingesting food contaminated with T. Gondii oocytes. Although acquired infections are rare in the United States, they can occur and toxoplasmosis should be in the differential diagnosis of an infectious optic neuritis.

The typical manifestation of toxoplasmosis is a retinochoroiditis, with a “headlight in the fog” appearance, due to dense inflammation of the vitreous; consequently, the diagnosis is often made clinically. This case describes a healthy 36-year-old Hispanic male who had an atypical presentation, with minimal vitritis and papillomacular involvement; thus serology was necessary for a definitive diagnosis. Treatment led to a rapid improvement in vision and ultimately a good prognosis.

Publication Title

Clinical and Surgical Ophthalmology

DOI

10.1167/13.15.75

Academic Level

faculty

Mentor/PI Department

Neuroscience

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.