Posters

Presentation Title

Arterial Stiffness and White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

Presenting Author

Courtney Austin

Presentation Type

Poster

Discipline Track

Patient Care

Abstract Type

Research/Clinical

Abstract

Background: Mild cognitive impairment, or MCI, is the stage before severe dementia in which one experiences cognitive and memory problems. For this study, amnestic MCI (aMCI) patients are examined because this group have memory problems that usually progress to Alzheimer’s Disease. It is possible to identify factors that prevent or slow down the progression of the dementia at this stage. Arterial stiffness is related to increased arterial pressure which may lead to the presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH). This study investigated the relation between the atrial stiffness and white matter hyperintensities volume in aMCI patients.

Methods: An inclusion criterion was established for a health control group and an aMCI group that include an age range between the age of 55-80 years with no preexisting cardiovascular condition. Arterial stiffness and the β-stiffness index are assessed at the common carotid artery measuring the carotid arterial pressure and carotid arterial wall intima-media thickness (IMT) using ultrasound and applanation tonometry. All groups obtained WMH measurements using T2/FLAIR MRI.

Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing β-stiffness and WMH. When controlling for age, BMI, and sex, carotid stiffness was significantly greater in aMCI groups (MCI: p=0.007). Greater WMH volume correlated with increased carotid systolic pressure and greater pulse pressure correlates (MCI: r= 0.40, r= 0.39, all p<0.001). In addition, greater WMH volume correlated with greater thickness and carotid stiffness (MCI: r=0.38 r=0.39, all p=0.001).

Conclusion: It suggests that arterial stiffness may plays a role in WMH as a risk factor for dementia.

Academic/Professional Position

Medical Student

Academic/Professional Position (Other)

MS1

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Arterial Stiffness and White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

Background: Mild cognitive impairment, or MCI, is the stage before severe dementia in which one experiences cognitive and memory problems. For this study, amnestic MCI (aMCI) patients are examined because this group have memory problems that usually progress to Alzheimer’s Disease. It is possible to identify factors that prevent or slow down the progression of the dementia at this stage. Arterial stiffness is related to increased arterial pressure which may lead to the presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH). This study investigated the relation between the atrial stiffness and white matter hyperintensities volume in aMCI patients.

Methods: An inclusion criterion was established for a health control group and an aMCI group that include an age range between the age of 55-80 years with no preexisting cardiovascular condition. Arterial stiffness and the β-stiffness index are assessed at the common carotid artery measuring the carotid arterial pressure and carotid arterial wall intima-media thickness (IMT) using ultrasound and applanation tonometry. All groups obtained WMH measurements using T2/FLAIR MRI.

Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing β-stiffness and WMH. When controlling for age, BMI, and sex, carotid stiffness was significantly greater in aMCI groups (MCI: p=0.007). Greater WMH volume correlated with increased carotid systolic pressure and greater pulse pressure correlates (MCI: r= 0.40, r= 0.39, all p<0.001). In addition, greater WMH volume correlated with greater thickness and carotid stiffness (MCI: r=0.38 r=0.39, all p=0.001).

Conclusion: It suggests that arterial stiffness may plays a role in WMH as a risk factor for dementia.

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