Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2013

Abstract

Europe as a multilingual continent hosts three main types of languages: dominant languages, autochthonous minority languages, and new minority languages. From a policy standpoint, planning for speakers of these languages and their needs become a complex matter in which many actors with different interests are involved. Of the many issues which policy-makers must deal with, the role of translation is often unexplored. However, in any multilingual territory, the adoption of a language policy implies decisions whether to translate or not. With that understanding, this paper explores the role of translation in language policy in Northern Ireland. By doing so, we highlight the translation implications of policy decisions. This helps to illustrate the complexity of language and translation policy. In detail, the paper explores the complexities of language policy as seen in translation policies for speakers of Irish, Ulster Scots, and new minority languages. Specifically, it considers translation policies in the judicial system, in the healthcare system, and in local governments.

Comments

Original published version available at https://doi.org/10.1080/14664208.2013.827036

Publication Title

Current Issues in Language Planning

DOI

10.1080/14664208.2013.827036

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