Posters

Discipline Track

Translational Science

Abstract

Knowledge of genetic and environmental (G x E) interaction effects on metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of G x E interaction effects on MAFLD in Mexican Americans in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV). The environment examined was depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). We examined potential G x E interaction in the phenotypic expression of MAFLD, including hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis, using variance component models and likelihood-based statistical inference. Significant G x E interactions were identified for hepatic fibrosis x BDI-II. These findings provide evidence that genetic factors interact with depression to influence expression of hepatic fibrosis. A better understanding of these genetic interactions are necessary to develop strategies and interventions to reduce the bi-directional relationship of hepatic fibrosis and depression.

Presentation Type

Poster

Academic Level

Medical Student

Mentor/PI Department

Family Medicine

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Gene by Environment interaction and metabolic-associated fatty liver disease in Mexican American patients with depression

Knowledge of genetic and environmental (G x E) interaction effects on metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of G x E interaction effects on MAFLD in Mexican Americans in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV). The environment examined was depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). We examined potential G x E interaction in the phenotypic expression of MAFLD, including hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis, using variance component models and likelihood-based statistical inference. Significant G x E interactions were identified for hepatic fibrosis x BDI-II. These findings provide evidence that genetic factors interact with depression to influence expression of hepatic fibrosis. A better understanding of these genetic interactions are necessary to develop strategies and interventions to reduce the bi-directional relationship of hepatic fibrosis and depression.

 

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