Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2016

Abstract

In Europe, policy approaches toward old minority languages (i.e., ‘regional’ minority languages) and new minority languages (i.e., ‘immigrant’ languages) are different. This is seen in language policy throughout much of the continent. And yet this distinction between speakers who belong to old minorities and those who belong to new minorities can be questioned, or at least the existence of distinct policy approaches for both groups when dealing with their languages. This paper will argue that if the ultimate goal of social policies – such as language and translations policies – is to bring about a more inclusive state, it may be helpful to think about speakers of old minorities and new minorities not as being essentially different in terms inclusion, but as having specific contextual needs which may or may not be the same. To do so, the paper will focus on the United Kingdom as an example of how things are and how they might be different. In particular, the paper will consider policies regarding translation, which must of necessity arise whenever the state makes choices about language that affect a multilingual population.

Comments

© 2016, ECMI.

Publication Title

Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe

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